Dentists, Toothpastes and Consumer Goods Companies

Dentists wordwide, but especially in the Americas (North and South, where medicine is largely private) invent all kinds of newer and altogether fraudulent ways to make more money.
Teeth cleaning by a dentist can't be good for you. He tells us that it will remove bacteria, etc. in our mouth. What happens in 1 day, after I have eaten my lunch and dinner? Bacteria and microbes don't need much time to multiply and infest my mouth again? What about 7 days, when I have had 7 lunches and Dinners? I am back to square one in the bacteria/microbes in my mouth, my mouth's bacteria are the same as when I had not done the cleaning, plus I am down about US$50 or US$70 (typical cleaning costs in US, Canada and Chile), with no permanent advantage. In the cleaning, the dentists has taken away another layer or my teeth, a real loss.

The only reason to do teeth cleaning is for aesthetic purposes (teeth too yellow, black etc.) but never for good hygiene or good health of the Teeth. The teeth cleaning for bacteria doesn't have an effect for more than a few hours.

Which brings us to Colgate and Proctor and Gamble, the makers of toothpastes. These guys advertise about removal or bacteria, cavities, etc. by using their toothpaste for 5 minutes every morning. Or flouride use strengthening my teeth, or calcium enhanced toothpaste for making it last longer. Whatever.
The problem is, the next time i eat anything, all these wonderful effects of the toothpaste are gone. It is very hard for me to believe that a 5 minute treatment of my teeth with all these substances has any long term benefit. This is under the assumption that most toothpaste will be rinsed out with water after you are done; if  you were to hold the toothpaste in your mouth for 2 hours every day you will probably see some of the beneficial effects of these additives. Holding a toothpaste for 2 hours in your mouth has not been recommended by Colgate or P and G, to the best of my knowledge...

I would rather put flouride or other toothpaste wonder additives to my tea and drink a flouride tea. Because after I drink my tea I don't rinse my mouth-not so for the toothpaste. Colgate and Proctor should start sellign Flouride Tea formulas for healthy teeth.

I do like using toothpaste, but that's for the instantaneous cleaning effects it offers, like a good shower with soap. But to make it sound like it's doing good for my teeth long term when it is enhanced by all these additives is blatant lying. The cleaning itself is good for me long term (every day I get rid of the food particles and bacteria, etc in my mouth) but a 5 minute treatment with Flourite, Calcium etc, is not going to help my teeth long term, is what I am saying.

The biggest proof that teeth cleaning like a dentist does or brushing your teeth is not a necessary thing to keep your teeth "healthy" comes from animals. So many mammals-elephants, tigers, cats, dogs, monkeys, etc etc. will last decades without any teeth cleaning from a dentist or without brushing their teeth-but will live just fine. Their teeth will keep providing the basic function of mastication without these procedures. If animals like these, whose jaws are very similar to humans, don't need any teeth cleaning or  brushing to live for decades-why would a human do?

This test of comparing medical procedures to how the procedures will work with closely related animals is one of the big ones to figure out if the medical procedure a doctor or dentist is doing on you is good science or bad science. If the science is real-the same procedures in larger mammals should be recommended and we should see the same benefits in them. Another test is global-the procedures should not very much from country to country. If they do-then it is most likely bad science. A heart surgery or diabetic treatment is same everywhere in the world, not so for teeth cleaning or antibiotic use or nutrition. Scientific medical procedures are robust and should not vary much depending on which country you live in.

Same goes for Shampoo. They add vitamins, eggs, almond oil, aloe vera...you can name anything under the sun and there's a shampoo out there in the world with that added to make strengthen your hair, make it look shinier, etc. The sheer variety of things which are good for my hair makes me be certain that they are mostly useless.

Shampoos will clean your hair, but just like what I mentioned for toothpaste, long term the additives in them will have no benefits for your hair. You can buy the shampoo for it's smell, texture, etc. but don't fall for all the smart looking marketing on the additives. The same argument holds for soaps benefiting your skin long term, etc.

In general, the more slick the marketing, the less likely that the science behind the product has any substance to it.
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Some more words on dentists.
 "Preventive" wisdom tooth removal should be completely avoided. Noone in India has their wisdom teeth taken out. They live just fine. I know plenty of people in their seventies who have them. When it does bother-take some pain killers. Give it a few days, about a week in some cases-and the pain subsides. Wisdom teeth apparently grow in spurts and irregularly over our lifetime, the best procedure is to get used to this and let them come out naturally. Keeping the wisdom tooth area clean is a good idea-instead of an abrasive toothrush, try chewing on chewing gum-it will pull out all the food particles in the area in a non-abrasive way.

Root canal procedures should be the last resort for infections which cannot be taken out by antibiotics and where it is clear evidence (from an image) that the infection is very deep rooted, or there is an abscess in the pulp. This probably happens in about 1 in 10,000 or 100,000 people, about the same frequency as a car accident death. Root canal is a surgery-it should not be taken lightly. A cut finger which is infected is not removed-but it is shocking to find how many people get a root canal surgery because of some stupid dentist recommending it as necessary. Obviously there is money to be made for the dentist-and that's why the are recommending it. A run away infection in your mouth is as likely as a run away infection in your finger-i.e. both are very unlikely, and 99% of root canals are unnecessary. A big dosage of antibiotics will take care of large infections in the the mouth.

There are sometimes other teeth under the gums, etc. which have not come out-your dentist will try to tell you that they will cause problems later on and "preventive" surgery can be done to remove them. You can see these teeth in Xrays. Ignore what the dentist says. In many cases I know of, these teeth stay embedded for the full life if a human being-they never come out. The dentist wants to make money, he or she obviously wants you to take them out. I have known plenty of people who live their life just fine with all these embedded teeth in their mouth.

Absolutely avoid dental checkups which they recommend you do regularly. They are useless. Just like a car mechanic, who is bound to do "preventative" maintenance on a car every time you take your car to him, dentists are designed to see problems. But a car mechanics knowledge of cars is 100 times better than a dentist's knowledge of your teeth and mouth, and that's where the problem is.

In summary-you are better off avoiding the scammers called dentists almost entirely throughout your lifetime. I say almost because there are a few cases where u do need them-if a tooth breaks for example, they will cap and put cement on it to make it look good and continue functiong. Also, for aesthetic purposes, like straightening of teeth, they are useful. But they are not serious medics or science guys. They are pretty much like car mechanics or cobblers-they will fix stuff-but please do not have high regard for this profession of dentists (and in general of medicine) just because they spend 7 years in some phoney institution to get their useless degrees.

More on dentists and antibiotic use here in this post (all cavities and caries are curable by Antibiotics).

More on consumer goods...

Post on 'The myth of alternative medicine'

Sanjay